Are You Ready For a Parrot

Please take a few minutes to read this and ask yourself some basic questions about your lifestyle, motivation and your ability to care for one of the most incredible, intel-ligent, sentient creatures on the planet.

  • How much time do you have every day to spend with a parrot?

One of the classic questions that we have heard in the shop is: “Do you have a low-maintenance parrot?” or.. “Do you have birds that don’t require a lot of attention?”  We would like to tell these people that they don’t deserve a potted plant, but we usually tell them politely, that a parrot is not for them. All of our birds need quality time every day with every member of the household. This is the commitment that you must be prepared to make.

  • Have you considered the cost of a cage and accessories required for a parrot?

Our baby parrots have been raised in our aviaries with a lot of love; they have been spoiled just as we all spoil our children and have been raised with the expectation that they deserve and will live in a healthy, happy and well-appointed environment. This means that our birds must have the appropriate sized cage, proper lighting, lots of toys and stimulation. We will not sell a bird without the proper cage and accessories. Our cages are priced very competitively, as are all of our products and we will do our best to work within your budget.

  • Do you realize that all parrots are messy?

In spite of our methods of minimizing mess, you must know that parrots are basically messy creatures. They love nothing more than indulging in one of our sticky vegetable and rice mixes, coating their beaks with the mixture and then shaking their heads, wildly flinging the mélange all over the walls…Or, throwing two thirds of the contents of the pellet crock on the floor before finally deciding to eat a few. Many family dogs hang out under or near the cage in hopes of finding bird treats. In other words, if your housekeeping is meticulous, a parrot is not the pet for you.

  • Are you looking for a bird as a GIFT for someone else?

This is usually a bad idea and in fact we do not sell gift birds. Occasionally, a customer will assure us that the intended receiver has always wanted a parrot or had a parrot in the home as a child. In spite of this, we will only sell a bird if the receiver is willing to spend time in the shop before the bird goes home and schedules time for our customary nutritional, behavioral and environmental counseling.

  • Are you looking for a pet for your child?

Parrots are not usually good pets for children. Based on years of experience, we have a general policy of not selling birds to children. There are always exceptions, and we have seen boys and girls who have saved their money, done their homework and have the support of their parents in their decision. But, the truth is, that most children lose interest and if the whole family is not committed, we have yet another unwanted, ignored or abandoned bird.

  • Do you think that your parrot needs a companion?

You are, or should be your parrot’s companion. If you are thinking of buying another parrot to fulfill your commitment to your first bird, this is not a good idea. If you have truly decided that you have additional time and have researched the needs of a second or a third parrot, we will do all that we can to help. After all, who are we to judge any of you! We have numerous pet parrots, but all of them do receive the attention that they need.

  • Are you ready to prepare Sprouts and Chop Vegetables and Fruits for a Parrot?

Our parrots have a better diet than most of the civilized (?)) world. They are weaned onto a variety of foods, including our living sprouts, lots of vegetables high in beta-carotene and choice fruits. A special pellet mix completes the dry component of the diet.   Our birds do not eat dry seed and you must be prepared to spend time preparing food.

  • Do you know how long a parrot may live?

King Tut, a male Moluccan Cockatoo, also known as the Greater for many decades at the San Diego Zoo lived to be 90 years old. How do we know? Well, he was part of an expedition led by “Bring ‘em Back Alive”, Frank Buck, a very famous, what do we really call his occupation-a photo journalist, a supplier of live animals for circuses back in the early twentieth century. There are import records showing the date that King Tut was brought to the United States. We also have many personal experiences with Amazon parrots in their fifties to eighties and cockatiels who have lived well into their twenties.

When you bring a parrot into your life, you are taking on a responsibility that may outlive you. Many families with parrots have set up endowments for their birds, made provisions in their wills or funded sanctuaries. You must at least make sure that you can make provisions for the future care of a parrot

  • Do you know how many parrots are abandoned every year?

No one knows for sure , but is has become an increasing problem. Many of the bird sanctuaries have waiting lists for problem birds. This is the primary reason that we are asking you to weigh this decision so carefully.

CONSIDER ADOPTING ONE OF OUR RESCUE PARROTS

Search your soul….Talk to our parrot experts at the shop and if you feel that you are ready to make a commitment, we are more than happy to help you find the “JOY OF PARROTHOOD”  with one of our wonderful birds needing a second home or a special well-socialized baby.